CFR T-SHIRT
CFR T-SHIRT

NEW T-SHIRT DESIGN

The 40th Biennial Combs Family Reunion T-Shirt will take on a new look and logo design, thanks to the creativity of cousin Meredith Renee Fox, daughter of Byron and Veronica Fox. (Edythe and Austin Fox) are her Grand Parents) 

The Shirt will only be sold on line before the reunion.  Click on this link to order.  


 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1zw8X0wn3860ETL-TFK-RYxwGIyOUXPmLl0O_elPDa7c/viewform

 


The shirts are $10.59, and can be picked up at the reunion.  






 
Meredith Renee
Meredith Renee
How did you come up with the design?

Meredith Renee-  “ I wanted to create something that honored our families but also celebrated the Combs family bond.  One day after reading our family history, it struck me that we are so blessed to know so much about our family history.  How awesome is it that we get to retrace our family steps? In some small way, I hope that this design will remind our family how we are all connected and why we are here celebrating every other year. Because of them, we can!  “
                      
 
 
 “Retracing Our Steps”
 
The reason for the State of Ohio filled with the names of the Combs parents and siblings is because 8 of the 10 children migrated from Hazard to Ohio during the 50’s to find better work opportunities. Only two of the families Uncle John, Aunt Charity and Mamma Janie remained in Hazard. The Combs Family tradition of hosting family reunions every two years began in Dayton, Ohio in 1965.  This year we celebrate the 40th Biennial Reunion held every other years.
 


Meredith Renee Fox is Assistant Director of Admissions at the University of Indianapolis.  She is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University and majored in psychology.  Meredith is also a photographer and graphic designer.  




 

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